Typing Agent has made some updates that I’d like to share with you in case you didn’t know about them already.

Students are required to do a Placement Test this year, and their results along with their new grade level targets will be used to get them on the right learning paths. Depending on how well they did, students will be placed somewhere between Paths A and E: Path A is for those who need to start with the basics; Path E is for those who know how to type well.

The Placement Test takes one minute to complete for novice typists. A three-minute maximum test is administered for students who meet grade-level targets. With this testing, students will be placed at the most suitable instructional level for them. No longer will struggling students be frustrated getting through overly difficult lessons, and strong keyboarders won’t be slowed down waiting for others having trouble to catch up to them. The Placement Test guarantees that each student is assigned the ideal lesson for them based on your targets and their results.

Students will then be given a two-minute Diagnostic Test, which is designed to show progress over time. As soon as students are done with the Placement Test, they are given Diagnostic Test 0. If they meet the minimum accuracy requirements, they get to move on to their lessons. Students repeat the same Diagnostic Test upon completing each unit of lessons from Worlds 4 and beyond. Their results are posted in the Reports section under Diagnostic Tests.

Another important feature has been added. If students manage to meet their WPM (words per minutes) and accuracy targets when doing their lessons, they get to advance. Students who don’t successfully complete the lesson are made to repeat it until they meet the requirements for moving on. We suggest that students be asked to repeat a lesson, even if they did so successfully, just to improve their scores. We want to encourage them to slow down and really build that muscle memory when it comes to landing on their keys. The lessons last one to two minutes, so students should spend four minutes total to complete each lesson.

Research shows that keyboarding skills improve with repetition. That’s all there is to it! Because we want students to improve, we’re wanting them to repeat the lessons. If your students protest, just get them talking about their favorite sports or playing the piano. Ask them about the fundamentals in those areas? For example, get them to recognize that you have to know how to dribble to play basketball, and the better you can handle the ball, the better a player you’ll be. And this comes with practice, with repetition. In the case of tennis, the pros train at least two hours a day to stay in peak form. Because we want our keyboardists to excel, we have to help them understand the power of repetition… it ALWAYS pays off!

Rev Up Your Typing,
Gia Deleveaux
August 20, 2019

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